Amy Teets Transcription

JEREMY [narration]:

 

Hi everyone and welcome to the ‘In The Shoes Of’ podcast where I make it my goal to see life as much as possible from someone else's point of view. Just like we all have a unique heartbeat, every single one of us sees life only from our own perspectives. Think about it. Can you see and process life exactly as Elon Musk sees and processes life? The answer is you can't, and it applies to every living conscious being here on this pale blue dot.

 

Hey everyone! Thank you for joining me today for ‘In The Shoes Of’. Today I have Amy Teets straight from New York, a costumer, a… What else? A user experience designer. Today we're going to talk a little bit about small-town drugs coming from small towns going to New York, working as a costumer, modern day misogyny, and a few other things which you're going to hear pretty soon here. Also, if you have friends or family members who are deaf or hard of hearing, please direct them over to intheshoesof.org, where I will be having each and every episode either transcribed or available in video form with captions. And if it's not there just yet, know that I'm definitely working on it. On with the show.

 

JEREMY :

 

How you been anyway? Before we get going with this, even though we're recording, but...

 

AMY :

 

I've been really--I've been good, I've been good! I just got a puppy and we've been here... I was in Ohio, I picked him up from Indiana and I was with my parents for like a week and a half with him and then we've been in New York for a week, so we're just getting adjusted to each other.

 

JEREMY :

 

Oh wow. That sounds cool. What is it - a him or a her?

 

AMY :

 

It's a him. Yeah, he's a little maniac. He thought, he was all like, hyper and then he just fell asleep on my foot, so...

 

JEREMY :

 

Is his name Toby?

 

AMY :

 

No, why?

 

JEREMY :

 

It's not! Oh, I don't know, I just, I always tend to call my friends' pets, when I don't know their names, Toby. I don't know why, like my friend has a parrot named Squawk I think, I don't remember the real name, I just call the parrot Toby.

 

AMY :

 

That's awesome.

 

JEREMY :

 

So, yeah, every pet is named Toby to me. What's your actual pet's name?

 

AMY :

 

His name is Ash or Asher. I think it's Ash to me, but...

 

JEREMY :

 

That is so cool! I love that!

 

AMY :

 

Thanks!

 

JEREMY :

 

Asher is like, the coolest name ever. Have you ever read any Christopher Moore books?

 

AMY :

 

No.

 

JEREMY :

 

Oh my God. I don't know if you're in fiction at all, but this is like, if you're ever stressed out or just anxious about whatever, just pick up a Christopher Moore book and you'll be taken into this wonderful fantasyland of humor and beauty. It's just, it's just, they're fantastic. Anyway, Charlie Asher is in the book, called A Dirty Job and yeah, it's phenomenal, he's one of my favorite characters. Totally beta-male character that I can relate with on a number of levels. Really cool shit.

 

AMY :

 

[laughs] Awesome.

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah, it's awesome. Anyway, you're probably busy so we can probably get started here, and I want to just say to Amy - thank you so much for joining me today and agreeing to do this, to go through, actually, this interrogation. I don't know if you knew it was going to be an interrogation.

 

AMY :

 

Alright, I'm ready. I'm ready. How honest are we supposed to be like..?

 

JEREMY :

 

As honest as you possibly can or are willing to be.

 

AMY :

 

Okay. If I go full-on honest, we might not use last names. We can decide at the end.

 

JEREMY :

 

Totally! And I can always edit out whatever needs to be edited out. First, I have to ask possibly the most important question of this entire interview, which is: what shoes are you wearing right now? And if none, the last pair that you wore.

 

AMY :

 

This is really important to me, because shoes are like everything. You know, I’m a lady with many shoes. But lately, I have been obsessed with this one pair of shoes that I wear all the time that are these wedge sneakers that I've had for like three years, I have the leather. And they're, like, falling apart. So, today - it's a nice day out, so I wore my black suede version of those since it's not like a crappy winter day. And so, that's what I wore to go pick up something from the vet around the corner. And I wear them all the time, I always, like, basically never wear flats. Ever.

 

JEREMY :

 

Oh wow. That's really cool. What's the brand?

 

AMY :

 

They're called Ash--oh, see! [laughs]

 

JEREMY :

 

[laughs] Whoa, amazing!

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, that's kind of an accident - I mean, I definitely like named him after something else. But yeah, these I'm obsessed with-

 

JEREMY :

 

Wait, they actually are called Ash?

 

AMY :

 

Yeah.

 

JEREMY :

 

Holy…

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, it’s this like designer brand. They started the whole, like, wedge sneaker trend and yeah.

 

JEREMY :

 

That is actually awesome - I thought that was just a mental slip, but no, it's actually Ash. That's really cool. Okay well, I'm going to go pick up a pair of Ash wedge shoes today. Do they make them for men too or no?

 

AMY :

 

No. Like some of them are like, hideous, but like there's, you know, it's like this fine line of like, yeah.

 

JEREMY :

 

Okay. Cool. So, what do you Miss Amy, do for a living?

 

AMY :

 

I am doing two things right now. For the last 14 years, I worked in costumes in film and TV, which I got into right out of school when I was… I went to school for fashion in Philly and I wasn't super interested in the fashion industry, but I got into film and TV, worked on a TV show there, then moved to New York, and been working on really, really big projects with the crew here. And the industry here is a really... We kind of all know each other and, especially since Facebook, we sort of all connect.

 

JEREMY :

 

Sure.

 

AMY :

 

And we're all married to each other and everybody's got like kids together and you...

 

JEREMY :

 

That's some major polygamy going on right there.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, totally. But because we worked together, it's like 12-hour days, like 10 to 12, to like, sometimes 16-18 hour, like, it's crazy how many hours you work together. So, they're like family. And I've been doing that for a long time and there's a lot of times I've been like, I need to do something else and get out of this. And, you know, transitioning careers completely from industry to industry is really hard. Plus, people don't really understand how much goes into the back end and like, why there's so many people on the credits of a movie and TV, they don't really credit everybody who worked on the show. But there’s, you know, hundreds of people who work on almost all of these projects. So, it's hard to explain when you're trying to switch industries like, how what I did applies to the new one. So, my new job is, and I'm doing like a freelance gig for that right now too, is user experience design, user interface, designing for like, apps and web sites. And right now, I'm working for a company designing a music festival web site, that's like, a brand-new music festival, kind of like Bonnaroo, which is really fun because you can basically do anything.

 

JEREMY :

 

That's really cool.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, it's a short gig and I can think, you know, it's only going to be like 40 hours of work, but it's like really fun and I think I get, because I've been freelance for so long and I've just been like, I'm like open to it. I get offered a lot of freelance gigs on that end as well.

 

JEREMY :

 

Awesome, and are you still doing both jobs then? Are you still in the, you know, costuming for the TV... And that's what it is, you're a costum… is that the word?

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, it's called costumer. I guess it's not actually like, I mean it's always, when you type it in, it always says it's a misspell. But that's what we call ourselves is a costumer. A lot of times I've been costume supervising like, really big period shows. I did the Vinyl pilot and The Get Down show on Netflix. I did like the first three or four episodes.

 

JEREMY :

 

That is cool.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, they're like, really big things and like, what I do is, the extras have to be pre-fit and their costumes have to be like, wrapped and sent to set and they all have to get dressed in the morning, before they go to set. It's like, this is just chaos. So...

 

JEREMY :

 

I imagine! And have you ever had any missteps happen? I mean, let's say just something went completely awry or, I don't know, maybe someone's blouse came completely undone at the back or something?

 

AMY :

 

I mean, always. There's always some fire. You know, there's always something. It's like, whenever you're doing anything like that, it's like, it's so on the fly. You do have a schedule and you have ways that you prepare for everything, but your entire job is like, "Well, we're not going to shoot that on Friday anymore, we're going to shoot it on Tuesday, how do we get these two hundred people ready?" You know, "Who can we get to be there? How do you make the calls, how do you adjust-" Like, it's all about just like, this high stress. Like last minute, you know. So, you try to do your best.

 

JEREMY :

 

Wow. So you essentially - you have to dress two hundred people, essentially?

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, some days you have to get three hundred people dressed in the morning, you know.

 

JEREMY :

 

If parents thought their job was hard getting their kids ready for school, for most of us, the layperson who's not in the entertainment industry, we’re like, "Wow, that actor is fashionable and probably just wore that leather jacket into work that day in the clothing they're wearing." Right?

 

AMY :

 

[laughs] Exactly.

 

JEREMY :

 

We don't think about all the Amy Teets in the background going through utter chaos, getting actors ready to do their job, right?

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, and it's really stressful for everybody. What I always do is, you know, we have everybody come in ahead of time - so you have a big day coming up and it's two hundred people, so you set it up so everybody, you know, people come in every 20 minutes and it's like going to the doctor's office, you're like, "Come on in. Take off your clothes, put this on. See if it fits, take a photo, send it to somebody to improve." We get it ready in the morning and then, you know, I don't always go to set, but when we do go to set and everything it's like, it's a brand-new location. We're in a church basement almost always. So  

yeah, the film industry is like… I was thinking the other day about how much money we give to the churches around here just because they let us use their basements.

 

JEREMY :

 

I didn't realize there was a correlation there between the entertainment industry and church basements in New York, at least.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, it's like - because they have a lot of space and it's like, a really great way for us to kind of like, load in and use their space and they're also like, not in use like, during the week in the mornings, like, no one's using them. So we set up, you know, two hundred people is probably like, ten racks and they're like, five, six-foot racks. Like long, like these huge metal industrial racks. You set up this huge space and changing rooms, and all the extras come in and they're all discombobulated and they're like, "Where's my stuff? Where's my form?" Like, "This is my first time." You know, they have to put on these random clothes everything gets, you know, you just have to like, control all of this chaos. It's pretty crazy.

 

JEREMY :

 

So what made you decide to transition from this?

 

AMY :

 

You know, they're a bunch of different reasons. When I started it was like, I did a TV show like, it was a cop show and I would start Monday morning, I was on set all day. Monday morning, you'd start at five or six in the morning and you would like, every day you get later and later because you have a 12 hour, a 10 to 12 hour turnaround, which means you have to be down and then you go back in. So then Tuesday you go in at 9:00. Wednesday, you go in at like 11. By Friday, you're going in at like noon or 1:00 and then you work all night. And I did two seasons of a TV show, like a cop show, like that and it was just so exhausting. I was like, "Is this something I really want to do until I'm like, 60 years old?" You know, it's like, you don't really have a life, there's no real work/life balance. So, over the past couple of years I've been trying to think about where I can do and get out of it. I took like a yoga teacher training and, you know, because there's so much money in yoga. [laughs] But I like, left Boardwalk Empire and took a month and like, got my teacher training, which is really great and really fun, but not a sustainable career. But then, it's really physical as well. And about three years ago, I had tendonitis in my arm from like, my wrist to my neck so badly I could barely like hold a cup.

 

JEREMY :

 

From your wrist to your neck. I don't think I've actually ever heard of that.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, just the costumes it's like, the amount of lifting and like... On Boardwalk, those like overcoats they were like 30 pounds and you're like, lifting everything like over and over and, you know, it's the repetitive motion of like, pulling the clothes out of the bags and putting them on the rack and then holding the st

eamer, which can be like really, you know, it could be a metal steamer which is really heavy and it's just really physical. You're on your feet for like twelve hours a day a lot of times. Yeah, so I started to get really worried. I'm like, "Well now I don't even know if I can do this." You know, I've always been like, "I don't think I want to do this forever," but now I'm like, really had to think about, "I don't think I can do this," you know. And it's really taxing. And so, you know, New York's been lucky, it's been really busy here. But it also made us all kind of get really great jobs at young ages, so all the people who are in their 30s like, we all have like great supervising gigs, whereas like it used to be that the supervisors were in their 50s and stuff. But now, all my friends are like, "Well we're in our 30s and like we've done all the jobs we want to do." Like, "We've done all the big jobs.

 

JEREMY :

 

Oh wow. So it’s time for something else then?

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, it's like, "Oh okay," like, "I just supervised a job for Martin Scorsese's thing, and like, Baz Luhrmann." And another person, you know, she supervised for the Steven Spielberg movie that was in town. And there is just like all this stuff around and we're, you know, all like, "Okay, now what?" Like, we did it, so do we do this for another 20 years?

 

JEREMY :

 

Right, and get tendonitis in both arms.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah. Or, you know, like have to have back surgery by the time you're 40 and, you know, it's not all like that bad, but you do have to be really careful.

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah. Oh, I checked out your website and I think I should plug that right now, and I'm going to. The website is AmyTeets.com. That's 'A', 'M' as in Mary. 'Y' as in yellow. 'T' as in teeter-tot. 'E E T S' dot com. AmyTeets.com. Go ahead and check it out today, because it's awesome. Amy, if you had to define yourself in the third person, what would you say?

 

AMY :

 

What I would say about myself is that like… this is how I feel I am. I grew up in like, a really rural area and now I live in the middle of Manhattan, basically.

 

JEREMY :

 

Where did you grow up, by the way?

 

AMY :

 

Like an hour north of Cincinnati.

 

JEREMY :

 

Oh, okay.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, like near Miami University of Ohio, which is like, actually in the middle of nowhere, just like a really rural area, you know. We had goats growing up as a kid. I was in like, the county fair and in 4H and everything. I mean, you’re a blank, and it's like, it's like basically the Post Office. Which, by the way, the Post Office now is open from like, 11:00 a.m. to like 2:30 p.m. The people who work there only work there like, four hours a day.

 

AMY :

 

I'm sending in my application immediately after this interview.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah. I would describe myself in the third-person as someone who can kind of like, fit in with anybody, and sort of be at home and like, find commonality with pretty much anybody. And I think it's possible for everybody, if they just kind of like, open their minds a little bit. But I think because I grew up in this really small town and, you know, understand where those people are coming from, and then live here among like ex-Pats from other countries and, you know, my friends here who are all transplants, and the people who are from New York and all of this, and sort of get like an idea of like, what people are about.

 

JEREMY :

 

Would you be able to find commonality with a Trump supporter? I'm assuming that you likely didn't vote for him this past election.

 

AMY :

 

It's been funny because on Facebook, you know, when I truly have hidden like most of my high school friends, and I do have some friends who live there, and I just saw him when I was home and I posted on his wall something about, I’m like, "You know, we're in it together, like I was just at the Women's March, you know. Don't like… we're going to get through this." We're like, the energy in New York right now is palpable. Everybody is fired up. We're all meeting. We're like, calling our Senators. My entire Facebook feed is full of people and like, numbers to call and actions to take. And everyone is really fired up and I'm like, I think that whatever it is or whatever change can possibly come of this. People here are really excited about, like, very energetic about it, and you can feel it. Like, you can feel it in the air and, I posted on my friend's wall like, you know, “I'm with you, you know, this is really scary. I've been listening in another podcast called "Pod Save America" and I'm like, “You know, the Russian thing is getting even more terrifying”, and, somebody like, wrote on his wall and try to get in a fight with me. [laughs]

 

JEREMY :

 

Oh really?

 

AMY :

 

And I'm like, never on Facebook, ever, I never post anything. I'm a really open person when you meet me, but like, I'm very private online. I feel like it's really dangerous for women to express opinions on the Internet. Let's take Leslie Jones, for example. So I am really careful about like, what I put out there. It's been really hard actually, even just to like, post for my website-like blog. For me, it just feels, like, dangerous. You know, it doesn't feel safe there.

 

JEREMY :

 

That's unfortunate.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, I don't know. I mean, and I don't know like, apparently no one gives a fuck about like changing policy on it, so you can just do whatever you want and like give up people’s home addresses and tell them you're going to like, murder and rape, like, women all the time, and like, no one's doing anything so...

 

JEREMY :

 

Have you experienced any of that?

 

AMY :

 

No, but I'm like, terrified of it. I've read so many articles about how helpless you can be. There's nothing to do about any of that and how no one's safe. I just read an article about somebody who, and Wikipedia apparently, only like 90 percent of the Wikipedia editors are men and this woman now, but like 10 years ago when she was 12 she started to make tiny edits on Wikipedia and she gets internet-trolled from other Wikipedia editors like, on the reg.

 

JEREMY :

 

Wikipedia editors? That's just crazy to me.

 

AMY :

 

I know, I was completely shocked as well when I read this article. So, every time she gets like the same thing - giving out her address, telling her they're going to rape or murder her all the time, because she wants to contribute to Wikipedia. So every time she gets, I guess, the article was basically like, every time she gets internet trolled, she'd then post another Wikipedia page for a female scientist on Wikipedia and dedicates it in the honor of the internet troll who just trolled her.

 

JEREMY [narration]:

 

Just an FYI to my listeners out there, I had some weird things happening with the audio, so it kind of interrupted the flow of the conversation, but we'll definitely hop right back to it. Thanks for bearing with me on this one; still working out a little bit of the audio kinks, but we'll get through it! Amy Teets is a very interesting and awesome person, so on with the podcast.

 

JEREMY :

 

So, do you have the name of the Wikipedia editor who keeps getting trolled?

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, her name is Emily Templewood.

 

JEREMY :

 

Emily Templewood.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, and if you go on Medium and just search for 'Wikipedia' and her name, that will, it's like, from February 6, so.

 

JEREMY :

 

I'll definitely check that out, thank you.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah.

 

JEREMY :

 

Okay, my next question is, and, we don't have to go too far down this rabbit hole or anything...

 

AMY :

 

No, it's fine!

 

JEREMY :

 

Okay well, my question then is: How bad do you think it is now? Are we talking about, once again, rampant misogyny here? In both a, not just in a psychological sense, but kind of the crazy, weird, passive-aggressive stuff guys do, but also in a physiological sense. I mean, what's going on out there? How bad do you think it is?

 

AMY :

 

You know, it's funny, I was trying to convince my mom that I didn't think Hillary should run, because I didn't think she could win because of like, the context of the world that I actually work in, and how the film industry is like, pretty blue-collar in that way, and we don't have like, an HR department... Oh, I probably mentioned how I had to have somebody kind of let go for sexual harassment, and after I went to the producers, it was sort of like, I wrote it all out, I was like, "Wow, this was something I and a lot of people sort of tolerated and don't really think about" or, I don't know, I guess being a gen-Xer, I don't really feel like my voice is… or maybe I just silenced my voice for a really long time and now I'm like, older and I'm like, "I don't give a fuck." I think in particular what we were talking about was I was on this job and this guy was just always really sleazy, and I just always got a really bad vibe from him. What ended up happening was that, I wrote it all down because it had gotten pretty bad, and I was like, "I don't want to deal with this anymore." And I realized that if I didn't protect the extras that were coming in and having to deal with him and his comments, you know, if they complained and I hadn't said anything, it's like, it's not just about me and protecting myself. It's about protecting them and my crew, and I was like, "Well, let's get all the examples and write them all down," and it ended up being like, three pages of examples of how he was inappropriate, or like just didn't do his job. And then when he did get let go... I went to my female unit production manager who like, runs the money and the office, and then the female producer on a female-created show, and my entire department was women except for the head designer, but... We all went in and we talked to our female producers and it was like, they were like, "We had no idea it was so bad." And what had happened was that he got given to us to work behind-the-scenes checking in extras because the lead of the show I was working on didn't like him and said that she didn't want him on set anymore. Because of the same reason. And I'm like, "This is just irresponsible." Like, if one of us says that he's a creep, I don't know, it's like - we're taught we can't really trust our instincts, but we need to look out for each other. And so, they gave him to us, even though the star of the show said he was a creep. And he got let go.

 

JEREMY :

 

How long did it take for him to get fired?

 

AMY :

 

It was 10-episode season, so it was one full-season of him and then maybe I guess I got through half of the second season, and I was like, "I can't do this”. Because, we had actually asked for him not to be allowed back, that we wanted to hire somebody else, and the producer who ended up firing him was like, "Oh it's fine. I already promised him the job. He contacted me privately because, you know, he's a creep." And she's like, "I'll talk to him.” And then she didn't talk to him, so then she didn't want me to call the lawyers or like, get anybody from the studio involved in L.A. because, you know, first of all, it would come like, way bad on her for not talking to him and rehiring him, even though we asked that he not be hired. Because, you know, we're working directly with him. Like, I guess I hadn't said it loud enough, you know. And that was on me too. You know, it's my responsibility to kind of like, say it a little bit louder.

 

JEREMY :

 

That's not something you should have to say loudly whatsoever. I mean, if someone just whispers something like that, people should immediately pounce on it. That's just, you know, common sense to me.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, and that's what happened was that I whispered it. I was like, "Can't he be on set some days? Like, I'm over this guy. He’s a… I don't like him, I don't like having him all time. Can we like, split it up with somebody? Can we alternate episodes?" And that's when I found out he wasn't allowed on set at all. And I'm like, "Well this is bullshit." So after I found out about that, it took me about a week and I got him out of there and, you know, he said at first, he was going to fight it and then he didn't. Like, he didn't have any... There was no moral standing and so, I made a few calls just to let other people know like, this is what happened. Like my ex-boyfriend and some other people who might be hiring him, because he works in the production department like on-set so, you know, it wasn't like I could like call my union and get protected through that. So we have to go through, like, because we don't really have an official HR department, there's like a lot of different ways that these things can fall through the cracks.

 

JEREMY :

 

Gotcha.

 

AMY :

 

And, you know, I haven't seen him since. Which is fine. I'm not like scared of him, I guess. I'm glad that like, he never reached out to me on social media or anything and tried to like, retaliate, or say anything. I was very lucky. But after he left, I got approached by like three or four different people and they were like, "I never liked that guy" or "he used to harass me as well" and "I'm so glad" or like "I yelled at him last year because he used to harass one of the office PAs" and, you know, I got a lot of people come up to me afterwards to tell me that they were glad he was gone.

 

JEREMY :

 

What you reminded me of was this guy from Australia. He took a trip to Thailand and he was stationed in Bangkok and evidently, he was surrounded a lot of times by guys who were gay but really just they didn't care about, you know, doing the catcalls to other guys. It was like, pretty intense like, I think he was probably propositioned a number of times and it got pretty intense. And he was like, "You know, I used to do this stuff to women. Now I understand that, wow-" it kind of gave him a really sick feeling and kind of made him kind of scared and objectified and all this stuff. I'm like, "I wish every guy who totally objectifies women like that, they should go and experience something like that." Seriously, I think it's needed, you know?

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, there was something - it might have been on This American Life and this woman was like, interviewing a bunch of guys from Australia and he's like, "No, they like it. They like it, they think it's fun." Like, when...

 

JEREMY :

 

I heard that!

 

AMY :

 

Did you listen to that one?

 

JEREMY :

 

Yes! That was a crazy episode, wasn't it? Like, "No, they like it." I can't do an Australian accent. But yeah, that was insane to me. Even the girl, God bless her, she was like, so intent on making them understand, trying to bring some reason into their lives and showing them statistics and facts and all that. But some... I don't know, it was like the guy was barely convinced at the end, you know?

 

AMY :

 

Yeah. I mean, and it's funny because like, living here... I don't know, I think I used to get catcalled worse in Philly, like for some reason I found Philly to be like, a little bit louder. But it's hilarious to me because like, I always joke with like that video of that woman get a catcalled and stuff, I'm like, "Well, it's like an African-American thing." Sometimes it's like more that, like during the day, like they do it when they're sober, and then the white guys always do it when they're like, wasted. So it's like, walking around my neighborhood during the day it's like, you know, my African-American friends, and at night it's like these dumb, drunk white boys, you're like "Okay."

 

JEREMY :

 

Okay, great! Getting hit from all sides here!

 

AMY :

 

Yeah.

 

JEREMY :

 

Let's switch gears a little bit - I wanted to ask you: When you die, what, if anything, do you want to be remembered for?

 

AMY :

 

I want to be remembered as a person who was giving and loving to her friends and family, and that the people in my life feel like they have been supported and loved. And I think that's it, that sums it up.

 

JEREMY :

 

That's really cool. That's some fundamental life stuff right there. But going on to a different direction then, is that part of your fundamental passion in life? To be there for family and friends, or is your passion like, you know, is it the user experience designer, a costumer, or is it you want to do something else? The new… this Amy actually eventually wants to go overseas and become a doctor without borders

or something like that.

 

AMY :

 

No, I mean I think, I guess the whole thing that feeds into it is like, with the costuming thing, and then got me into the U-X, is that I love to make, you know, that chaos and like creating that moment when they walk in and they're so like, disoriented and making it easier for everybody and less stressful. It's like how, I think that I'm a really efficient person and I understand, like I said, like a bunch of different point-of-views and can kind of see like big picture stuff and like, learning about how people learn and how people understand different things. And that's the part of the costuming and the costume-supervising that I loved, was to make things easier for everybody and easier to understand and things to run smoother and be less stressful. And that's the passion that I take into like, designing websites and - because like I mean, how many times, I don't know if your parents call you and ask you to teach them how to use their iPad, but mine do that like on a regular basis. Or how to use their iPhone and I'm like, "Well, if my dad can work this thing that I'm making while he's drunk in his hot-tub, then we've succeeded." You know, as long as my dad can use it, like, while he's drinking whiskey, like whatever doing his thing, that's a good product and it's easy to use. And I think that it kind of goes into my whole thing of just like, being there for friends and like trying to make their lives easier and, you know, this morning I was just thinking about... I had like a whole thing because the dog has like, some parasite. And I was just like, really overwhelmed with the vet's message, and the first few visits to the vet are really expensive, especially in New York. And you're like, "Alright, so is my vet ripping me off?" And I called three friends and, you know, they all call me back, basically all the same time even though like, I text each of them at different times and my first friend was like, "Yeah, this is how we do this." Like, you can't navigate New York without double checking with all your friends, because like you can't even trust Yelp, you know. And so you're like, "Well is my vet ripping me off or is this actually a thing," and it's like, "Do I really need to give them all this medicine? Is this like the, you know, a comparable cost?" And it's like that with everything here, it's like: “Well, what about your dentist? What about your hair stylist? Like, where are you going to get every last little thing?” You just can't do anything on your own. You know, I've been thinking about that a lot lately. To go off on my own tangent, is like - when I was in Ohio, my parents had workers in their home and this woman who I had been nice to for like, three or four days and introduced her to the puppy and she's like, "Oh, where do you live again?" And she's like, "Where are you visiting from?" And I'm like, "Well, I'm not visiting" Like I still consider that my home. You know, that's where I'm from, that's like, part of who I am, you know, is this small-town part, like, small town girl. This farm girl - like that farm girl was always there. "Oh, where are you visiting from?" I'm like, "New York." And she like, literally flinched. She flinched!

 

JEREMY :

 

Really? Flinched?

 

AMY :

 

Yeah. And she like gave me a look and I'm like, "We've been friends for three days!"

 

JEREMY :

 

Why?

 

AMY :

 

I think there's this fake news out there about how New Yorkers are all... Like elitists, like liberal, like assholes, and that we think we're better than everybody else. Somebody said like - I don't know where I read this, that they think that we're like the Capitol in the Hunger Games.

 

JEREMY :

 

[laughs] Really?

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, and I'm like, "Uuuuhhhm..."

 

JEREMY :

 

Wow, talk about putting something huge into a small box.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah. And I'm like, "Guys but like, you know, like I don't know if you all work like, 60 to 80 hours a week like where you live. But like, that's what we do. So I don't really think that that's comparable. The people in ‘The Capitol’ in the movie like, don't really like, work at all, so..."

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah, that's really unfair.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, I mean it just it really bothers me because it's like, they all want the same thing. Like, knowing them and growing up with them, and then being here--and it's like they're truly just like, turning us against each other and making us into two different colors, which makes no sense to me when, you know, we all want, like, a good living. You know, being from, like seeing both sides. I mean I was raised in a very, don't get me wrong, I was raised in a very liberal house. You know, that we watched the news every night, I was like, raised on Dan Rather and, you know, my father was never into Republicans. And I was definitely raised in like, at my high school--you know, my parents had their Master's degrees but like, a lot of people that I went to school with, you know, lived in trailer parks and their parents didn't make a lot of money. And so there was a lot of growing up - I was always like, trying to be the voice of reason and being like, "Well, you know, black people aren't all bad." That's an actual phrase that would come out of my mouth, like, growing up. "They are not all bad."

 

JEREMY :

 

You had to actually convince people that not all black people were bad?

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, these like political debates you get into in high school are like, basically so base.

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah.

 

AMY :

 

And I mean, I don't mean to generalize everybody I graduated with, but like there was some serious racism there and it's overt. It's not subvert at all.

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah, and that's been coming out a little bit more recently too, with this past election I think, you know?

 

AMY :

 

Yeah like, that was twenty years ago, you know, the only thing that like, has changed really in my area is the heroin epidemic. And I was just talking to a friend of mine who was like, "How many people have we gone to highschool with and we graduated with who are dead now?" Like O.D.ed. It's like, it's a lot.

 

JEREMY :

 

Like what is a lot?

 

AMY :

 

I mean she said, "Oh do you remember this person and that person?" And I'm like, "Yeah." And I'm like, "Well I don't know." And she mentioned like, three or four people from her graduating class and she's a couple years younger. And I said, "Oh, you know, this person and that person is dead," and I'm like, "this person was found in a ditch," and I was like, "Whatever happened to that girl in that class that they said she got murdered?" And they're like, "No, she just O.D.ed and he stuffed her in a closet-" like, crazy.

 

JEREMY :

 

What?

 

AMY :

 

Yeah.

 

JEREMY :

 

And this is all in Okeana, Ohio?

 

AMY :

 

Well like, what's happening in the Cincinnati area, in the Midwest. I mean, pretty much like in West Virginia and stuff is the oxy epidemic and I guess New Hampshire had said that that was one of their main issues this election is like, the oxy and heroin epidemic is insane right now. You know, my little brother was a drug addict for twenty years, so I definitely have like a personal... And now he's a drug counselor, so I have a lot of information about it because he's been sober for like five years and working at a drug treatment facility. Yeah, I mean there's at least in my grade, there's at least--right off the top of my head, I know there's at least one or two people that I graduated with who have passed, that have O.D.ed. That's at least. I mean, we were just talking in casual conversation over the years we could think of like, six people within like, three grades and that's - we don't even know everybody, you know.

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah. Is crystal meth also something that's still rampant?

 

AMY :

 

I was asking my brother about that and he's like, "Not as much." You know, they don't see it as like, as often in their area, it's just mostly like oxy and heroin.

 

JEREMY :

 

Oh, okay.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah.

 

JEREMY :

 

Gotcha. Are you religious at all? I mean, growing up in rural communities, a lot of times there's pretty strong religious roots there.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah. My family was... that's a pretty, it's a very like kind of long story.

 

JEREMY :

 

Go for it.

 

AMY :

 

My family - we didn't go to like, organized church. You know, I think my dad considers, like, nature to be his place of like spirituality. And I would say that he probably would say that he does believe in God I think, but we don't really, you know, we didn't grow up in a religious house. My mom was raised Quaker, so she  went to boarding school and she like has her own--she can be really quiet. You know, like they have like a very meditative prayer practice, so at meetings and the whole thing, but we never went to meetings growing up and... Pretty sure my mom prays and she has her, you know, she considers herself to have a relationship with her God to use turn a phrase from the Christian community.

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah

 

AMY :

 

In my high school experience, there was a secular youth group called Young Life. And because my brother had started using in like sixth and seventh grade and I was two years older, right when he started using and my home life got really chaotic, I started to go to this youth group and got really into church like, all through high school. So I was like born again in high school, actually.

 

JEREMY :

 

Oh wow. But it was a secular church?

 

AMY :

 

Oh yeah. It was a secular youth group that they do through high schools.

 

JEREMY :

 

Oh okay.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, and then you like after that--when I got my license, I would like either go with friends to church on Sunday and then Bible study on like another night. And then, this youth group on another night and I ended up at a First Baptist Church I guess. One of the youth leaders there was like, my youth leader from the other thing, so.

 

JEREMY :

 

Oh okay.

 

AMY :

 

But the whole thing like fell apart in like this royal, amazing way. My youth leader got his girlfriend pregnant and had to quit the church and the youth group, and Danny was just getting worse. And it was like, my family for a little while and it just wasn't--it just wasn't safe anymore.

 

JEREMY :

 

Right.

 

AMY :

 

Like, it didn't feel like home anymore. You know, I was just kind of like lost all over again. But like, you know, it meant a lot to me at that time and I understand, like, why it was so important. And that's another way that I like, I guess I can see from that point of view and like how they believe so passionately about things. But it was like, a lot of the things that when I was in high school, you know, are still kind of hard to swallow like, the whole gay thing and I'm like, "Come on you guys. Like, it's not a choice." And I just think that like, you know, growing up in a very accepting home, it's really hard to learn hate I guess. And some of what I saw is like, it comes from a place of hate. I mean, not saying that like, all these people were but they, you know, a lot of them were. Like, they do use Christianity as an excuse to hate. And anybody who tells you differently is lying to themselves and lying about people they're hanging out with, because I mean, I saw it, I was in it. It was like--it wasn't always like, up front and center but, you know, people bring their prejudices to wherever they're at. Even if it's a church.

 

JEREMY :

 

Of course. Yeah, and you can always use scripture to, in whatever context you want to, defend your weird point of view or whatever point of view - even if it's a good point of view. I mean, you can totally use it.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah exactly. Which is dangerous.

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah.

 

AMY :

 

And over the years - like in college I, you know, at the end high school I like, pretty much all but dropped out of like, going to church, and in college like that definitely was not on my agenda. Just like, not like sort of a crisis of faith, I guess. In college, I started doing yoga, started focusing like more on that. And like, thinking about meditating and stuff. Then like, over the years, it sort of started to be more of my life and like, seeking some sort of like spiritual side. And last November, right after the election actually--it came at a really good time. I learned Vedic meditation, which is mantra-based meditation. Let's see, how many months is that? Three months now.

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah.

 

AMY :

 

I've been meditating twice a day for twenty minutes a day.

 

JEREMY :

 

That's really cool.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah.

 

JEREMY :

 

They say it's really good, I mean it helps in so many different ways, like even with physiologically speaking as well as just helping us focus and, in all aspects of life it's totally beneficial.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah and it's been really great and it's like, not any other - like I've tried a bunch of different types of meditation and this one like--I think is just a matter of finding the one that kind of, like, clicks with you and it's the same with finding your God and finding your own space, if wherever that journey may lead you. So for me, this really clicked and it's been really awesome. It's really intense at first because you're sort of like, bringing up all these past stresses. And so, one of the funniest things was like, I felt really at peace but I was like, everything was so on the surface. And I had a couple of people pick fights with me. This background person called me a fucking bitch at work. And it was... [laughs] Like the week after the election, so like no one was having it. Everybody was like, "You don't get to talk to women like that. This is not anything we're doing," like you know, people ganged up on--like I didn't even have to say anything. And I have never been spoken to before like that at work, like that was unbelievable.

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah seriously! What the hell did you do that would prompt such a ridiculous response anyway?

 

AMY :

 

I mean it was so over the top. I was like, "Whatever rage you're feeling makes no sense like in so many ways." Like he was mad that he had to stand in line, even though I said he shouldn't be standing in line. And then he was like, "When are we going to get wrapped? This is nonsense. I've been standing here for 10 minutes," and I'm like, "Yeah but you're getting paid for another four hours. So like-"

 

JEREMY :

 

So shut up.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, so like everything about his anger was completely absurd. But it was like, I had turned myself into a lightning rod. It was like hilarious - and I almost got like--some girl tried to start a fight with me at a bar, and I was just like completely... I was like more furious than ever, but I was so calm.

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah. Totally.

 

AMY :

 

It was the weirdest thing. So yeah, so that was really funny.

 

JEREMY :

 

So that's how it's helped you, I guess, in your day to day life - to just deal with--to not take things at face value. Like, that's their problem. You're not taking that on a personal level. Is that what you're saying too, that it's helped you do that?

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, I mean the funniest part is that like that's neither one of those things really--they rarely ever happen. And it was somehow like me being so sort of like Zen out was like a lightning rod for people to kind of like... It was like attracting this anger for like a week. It was just really funny. But since then it's like every--you know, I haven't gotten yelled at, it's just sort of like you're in the flow and like, very specifically for me, just like sort of being content with where I'm at in life, and trying not to get so stressed out about the past and the future, and being really in the moment. I mean it's so cliché, but it's like really true and it's like this feeling of, kind of like a wanting or that like longing for something else is sort of fulfilled in some way and you're like sort of it's like ineffable. If you feel that I guess and like you have that in your life then once it goes away you're like, “Oh that's gone now. Cool.”

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah. It is such a relief. People say live in the moment and all that but it is your right. That’s a fundamental truth that we always tend to forget and it's almost like maybe there's something hardwired in our DNA that tries to pull us away into the future and pull us back to the past and both are just... It's neither beneficial unless you’re like, you know, goal setting and practical matters for thinking about the future but not stressing out about, “Well what if what if I grow a fourth arm?”, assuming that you had a third arm already, you know? In the future and that's going to cause me something exciting because I've already dealt with the 3rd arm before, you know? Things like that in the past like, “I can't believe I stole that ice cream truck when I was 10!”

 

AMY :

 

I guess it was probably from like a hard wired like, you know where the danger was before and you're like looking out for the danger ahead. But, you know, we can get really mired in it on like the stress and all that, and everything.

 

JEREMY :

 

So what do you think Amy are the biggest things, and you can take some time thinking about this one and maybe just focus on three, the biggest things that need to be fixed, on this planet, this day.

 

AMY :

 

Today? Just today?

 

JEREMY :

 

Well, let's just say that during this period of time, at this at this very point in time, what are the biggest things that are wrong in your eyes with this -- with what's going on the planet. It doesn't have to be political, it can be or environmental or it doesn't have to be just completely on the liberal side of thought. It can be whatever.

 

AMY :

 

I think that what needs to be fixed like in the immediate is, clearly climate change is real. We have to get on top of that sooner than later. Doesn't look like it's happening any time soon because everything that is going down is just like a hot mess. I mean it's 60 degrees right now in New York and it's February 20th. Like that's not right.

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah. It's like 200 degrees here in Austin. So that... there's something wrong there.

 

AMY :

Yeah exactly. It's, you know, only because I don't think it's reversible so, I'm not sure. You know I feel like that's an immediate issue. I think the second part is, just seeing people from... like allowing people to have their own their own space to find their own god. Stop trying to make your god the right god.

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah.

 

AMY :

 

That I think will get us to a lot farther place and maybe just a kinder place and then people if they're interested and they can find it themselves. And then there's a safer place for them to, you know, root out their own truth and like find their own their own safe place and their own happiness. There's like a real, with like my meditation is, especially if you're going to teach it is that... I forget the phrase exactly but it's like you have to ask a few times about it and show genuine interest so when -- unless people show me genuine interest and want to go to learn more about my particular type of meditation, it's not like I'm going to like -- the rule is like don't unless they ask like a couple times like, you know, of course like send them in the right direction. But, you know, giving people the freedom to find their own find their own place.

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah. No shoving things down the throat.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah. It's like, you know, some of the other stuff that I've been listening to about how we create radical Islam and our responsibility in that. And that by persecuting regular Muslims and it makes me... it just breaks my heart.

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah, me too.

 

AMY :

 

Because it's like you can't to say that these people are just like fleeing to radicalism on their own. Like something happens to them and I don't know if that's all, number two and then number three, I just feel like we need people to seek the actual truth. And like what's happening in the news right now and I was just watching the documentary, is it the 13th? Or the… It’s 13th. About the 13th Amendment and it's about black history and preventing African-Americans from voting and the prison system and the drug war and... I think that a lot of those things really need to be addressed in order for us to make real change in our country. I guess that’s four. [laughs]

 

JEREMY :

 

No no, that's fine, you can list as many as you want. This is good stuff!

 

AMY :

 

But I think the most important thing in, to go back to what you said earlier about like a person who kind of was like a dick to me on Facebook and he was like, you know, “give this person a chance. If you don't like it then you can leave.” And I'm like “OK, number one I don't have to like…” And I said this, I'm like, “It's America. I don't have to like the president just like you don't”. That’s our freedom and I could say that… loudly!

 

JEREMY :

 

Exactly!

 

AMY:

 

On every social media site. It's still legal to do that! It’s still legal. And I don't necessarily need to be bullied into trying to shut up but that's my actual freedom in this country and somebody else was like “you're making Russia a scapegoat”. And what terrifies me about the people who are on the other side of this is that it's so hard for them to decipher what actually is the truth and they're getting half-truths so much and like taking them as the law and rules and as this is actually happening and it's so easy for the current administration to tell so many half-truths and actual total lies.

 

JEREMY :

I believe they're called alternative facts

 

AMY :

 

Alternative facts?!

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah, just to correct you there!

 

AMY :

 

Exactly. To me that's one of the most dangerous things right now in this administration is telling lies as if they're truths and then convincing people of those things and then people not caring enough to actually find out whether or not it's actually true. And like fact checking it and the whole thing about the fake news was that the guy who was posting the fake news is like well, “when I put out fake news about...”, unlike liberal sites he's like, “the liberal people like completely debunk it within like the comment section within like the first four comments”, and he's like, “if I can put out fake news on the alt right sites no one debunks anything.” I mean I don't, maybe I'm paraphrasing it, but it's dangerous.

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah.

 

AMY :

 

And I'm sure there's an article about this but it's something that we've been talking about and it's a dangerous place to live when you don't know where the actual truth is.

 

JEREMY :

 

Well I just heard an interview with Stephen Colbert, I can't remember the podcast but he was saying, “you know, when we can't all agree on what reality is, then we have no basis for a discussion.” I mean I'm paraphrasing that for sure but that's what it is. Like, reality now is all of a sudden…

 

AMY :

 

In question?

 

JEREMY :

Warped. Yeah.

 

AMY :

 

And the minute they start to create an alternative reality, then they can do actual dangerous things and get away with it.

 

JEREMY:

 

Yeah.

 

AMY :

 

You know it's this alternative reality that Hitler started... It's very, very close to what happened. It's like terrifying to me. Now there's immigration stops, somebody posted on Facebook there was an immigration stop in Queens and they're like, “it's between this block and this block, avoid it.” I mean, this was a white friend of mine reposting it on Facebook. It's like, this is really happening in New York right now, where it used to be like a safe haven for people to try to get on their feet and, you know, they all pay taxes! So… [laughs]

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah, and Lady Liberty is right there too, you know, walk over there... Yeah [laughs] I know what they're saying that's it. You know, some people would probably think, “Oh Amy, that's just hyperbole”, about the, you know, referencing Hitler and whatnot but I mean you got to think about how... I mean I'm no expert on the subject, historically speaking, but yeah that's -- I think there are some definite there's some definite parallels and a lot of people would agree with you.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah. That's what I mean and this is how it started it's like, he created a world where they don't trust the media and more and they don’t trust the news. These are the first steps. It's really scary to me. I was at home with my dad and he puts on CBS News and, you know, for him that's his news or whatever and that's his choice. The interview was like, “How do you think the new president is doing?” And they went to like a diner in the Midwest and interviewed a bunch of likes, fifty / sixty-year-old white dudes.

 

JEREMY :

 

[laughs] Right.

 

AMY :

 

And I was like, “Okay, so we know how fifty and sixty-year-old white dudes feel”, like they had a voice for the last 200 years. I mean I am really curious about how many white dudes there are in America and how much, [laughs] you know, how much voice they have. Like what's the proportion? Like you're killing me.

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah yeah I know it's -- Do you know, being this like kind of middle aged white dude. I'm like wow I'm in this weird demographic right now or I'm just going to start saying I'm a very light complexed Latino. [laughs]

 

AMY :

[laughs] Yeah. It's like “guys, we’re fucking coming for you.”

 

JEREMY :

[laughs] Seriously! I'm like yeah that's probably about time, you know!

 

AMY :

 

With my liberal gay agenda… [laughs]. My single lady…

 

JEREMY :

 

You know, I think if anything though out of this whole political like you said ‘hot mess times 10’ really is that, wow! It's really, like you said earlier too, is that it's firing people up. There's an energy in the air and people are rising up, you know? The gay population, women, minorities. And that to me is probably, if there is a silver lining to it, that's a beautiful silver lining right there. People are standing up they’re not just -- it's like, what 50 years ago or so? We just got, supposedly got rid of like segregation, even though I've heard stories of schools in the south still having to be federally mandated to not segregate their children but I don't know that -- I can't. I'd have to look that up. Maybe I’ll try to find a reference for that.

 

[music plays]

 

JEREMY :

 

You know, what I mean? It's like why we can't regress. But at the same time I'm glad to see that people are rising up, you know?

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, it's mobilizing people I guess? It's inspiring people to get more active for sure and be louder. And when you realize that you're not the only voice or you're not the only one who feels like that it's easier to kind of say your truth and speak your mind and fight for it, you have to fight. Like now we have to fight for it which is -- I guess we were being a little naive about it before when the Koch brothers have been winning state elections and preparing senators and for years, and that's where, you know, the one side has now come into really strong power

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah, very strong power. Well I have just two more questions for you. The first one being, and since we delved deep into a little bit of the murky waters of the present state of things. What do you think are the best things about life here on Earth how does -- what does Amy Teets see as being, “Wow, this is a really beautiful thing that's going on my planet and what…” I don't know, it could be you’re grateful for this blade of grass that Toby A.K.A. Ash gets to go play in sometimes. I am going to call him Toby, by the way.

AMY :

 

No worries. I like it. He's been sleeping the whole time, it's been nice.

 

JEREMY :

 

[laughs] Amazing!

 

AMY :

 

[laughs] That's what I'm thankful for! [laughs] he's like napping. I'm thankful for every puppy nap. Everything aside, I am really lucky that I am a woman who came of age during this time and that I have my own career, my own life and, you know, I can have a leadership role in my life and I can provide for myself. And that wasn't always the case. You know and that there is a place now for women who are unmarried and I’m not looked down upon like a social pariah or something like that and I can just live my life.

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah.

 

AMY :

 

And I'm thankful for that. I mean, I guess it was just in the 70s and the 80s that like a woman couldn’t even in certain states you couldn't get a credit card without your husband's permission [laughs] and stuff like that.

 

JEREMY :

 

That’s crazy

 

AMY :

 

Yeah. Just like, you know, simple things. And yeah, I'm really thankful that I get to live here. And that was something I've always wanted to do. Ever since I was little on my goat farm, I've always wanted to live here and that I could like make that a reality.

 

JEREMY :

 

So cool. Were you like drawing pictures of, I don't know if you can draw pictures on goats, but like a map of New York with a goat friendly marker? [laughs] I don't know, but…

 

AMY :

 

It was just something I always wanted to do and I was like, “I have to get out of here”, or I just like, “dream big” and, you know, it really is -- I guess, like growing up, it really did surprise my parents they were like, “Where are you going? What?” They love their rural life, and it's like really quiet and I'm completely the opposite. So it really surprised them. But I was really happy that I get to live here and provide for myself. Some days it's harder than others and it feels like everything costs so much money here. But for the most part it's really great to be part of, you know this city has its own energy and it’s like a living breathing thing.

 

JEREMY :

 

No, I truly believe that too.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah. And once you finally get into the rhythm of it and you're in the zone with it. You can be, you know you’re simpatico with the city of New York and you like find your place within it. It can be a really great thing. It takes a little while, there's some bumps in the road as you start when you move here [laughs]

 

JEREMY :

 

Of course, yeah.

 

AMY :

 

It’s a harder place than most. But, like I said once you get your family here, your ‘friend-family’ and all that. You look out for each other.

 

JERMEY :

 

Yeah. I love New York. I need to go back. I want to go back. I'm going to get a plane ticket tomorrow. No I can't. But I want to.

 

AMY :

 

You should! come visit!

 

JEREMY :

 

...seriously. I'm going to visit, for sure. My last question actually is going to start off with having you imagine something for me.

 

AMY :

 

What?

 

JEREMY :

 

So. Imagine that one day you're walking through a lush green park. Let's say it's Hyde Park in London, on a beautiful spring day when suddenly a yellow spacecraft appears and out steps an alien who looks and talks very much like the British actor Benedict Cumberbatch, but does not blink much if at all. After exchanging pleasantries about the weather and what cricket is, the alien who has identified himself as an intergalactic journalist by the name of Ford Prefect from another more fashionable part of the galaxy, asks that you give him the most accurate description of how you see and understand life on this planet. What would you tell this alien?

 

AMY :

 

Urgh! It's so hard to answer the question without knowing his context of his life experience and how he understands it.

 

JEREMY :

 

Well, let's just say that he, you know, borrowing from probably some terrible B-movie I've seen in the past, that, he's been watching us from afar for a number of years anyway and he's just still -- he's kind of doing this little -- He's just researching the planet, you know? But he knows enough about it, you know, he knows enough context to identify what you're talking about. He'll know what you're talking about.

 

AMY :

 

OK. I guess that I would say that everybody has their own their own journey and everybody is sort of looking for what it means for them and for some people it's being creative and for some people it's making money and for some people it's finding God. And for some people it's finding love or a family or friends and family and their relationships, and that it's different for everybody. And that everyone’s sort of searching for their own place in the world. And that's sort of what the human journey is about. And I would also ask him why he looks like Benedict Cumberbatch.

 

JEREMY :

 

That's really cool. And yeah I did actually talk with him because this is a real person. Well, alien. I don't know if they call themselves people I didn’t ask him that. But yeah, he just saw an episode of Sherlock and thought well I'm going to mimic that. So he had actually a costumer put together a Benedict Bumberbatch costume.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah,I just finished watching that series. It's so good!

 

JEREMY :

 

Oh, it’s so -- I love that series. Seriously. Yeah, I still have to watch the final season but it is the final season right?

 

AMY :

 

Yhea, I think so. I mean because he's getting so famous, but, oh my god the final season dude. I just watched the final episode like last week I like saved it and then I was like, “no there's two of them!” Oh, it was the best.

 

JEREMY :

 

Really. Oh…

 

AMY :

 

I thought there was only three episodes but I think there's four or something and I was like I didn't realize that I was going to get to watch two more episodes. I was so stoked. And then I went back and rewatched. I like rewatched them all the time so I went back and like rewatched them from the first season.

 

JEREMY :

 

That’s what I just did too! I rewatched all of them up until the first -- this recent season -- so I can't wait. It's going to be awesome. Heck yeah! And I like that. I love your explanation too of how you see, you know, life and explaining kind of the, I don't know the human condition, what we're all after. That was cool. I can't wait to put this on the podcast and get this out there for whomever to listen to. So it's going to be cool. Well, Amy, thank you. Seriously thank you so much for taking time. I know you are incredibly busy so I really thank you for taking time out to talk with me. Give me your perspective on things. Is there anything else the last minute thoughts about like, “oh, you know what, this is actually part of my perspective! This is what defines me. Any last thoughts that you really want to get across about yourself?

AMY :

 

No, just that, it's so nice to talk about kind of like a higher truth or the reasoning behind certain things and kind of get into this idea of the human narrative and human existence because like this morning I was just feeling like, you know, when you feel like sort of overwhelmed and bogged down by the day to day. Because Toby over here has some sort of parasite that I have to give him, you know, like three things a day for the next week and I'm like, “Oh my god.”

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah

 

AMY :

 

And you're like I'm in charge of this little thing and it's or whatever. He doesn't seem sick. He's fine, you know, but he has something that could make him sick and I'm like, this sucks. And getting bogged down in the little tiny -- truthfully, the figurative and literal parasites of life [laughs]

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah

 

AMY :

 

Can be really overwhelming. But it's nice to -- That you took the opportunity to kind of like talk about something a little bit bigger than all of us.

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah that's cool. I think we have to escape our ourselves a little bit and ask -- and you though, even though of course this is --  This episode is about you and your perspective but I know exactly, exactly what you're saying. Escaping the kind of micro-cosmic things that go on and start taking a lot of our attention, you know? I know what you're saying.

 

AMY :

 

It's like whenever I start to get bogged down by the minute details of some job I was trying to do and, you know, “we don't have like enough shoes for this scene and they want to put a bunch of people doing this in that scene and there's not the right color” and it's just all the minutiae of all this. I just call my parents and I'm like, “So what's happening in the country? What are you growing in the garden?”

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah.

 

AMY :

 

“Oh well we're having problems raccoons eating all the corn” [laughs] you know? Anyway, well thank you. I needed that.

 

JEREMY :

 

[laughs] Yes, seriously, even there, even you telling me that right there I was like, oh that sounds kind of --there’s something peaceful about that. I don't know why.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, that’s the biggest problem right now. They're like, “oh God the corn.” You know, “we just didn't get enough corn last year.” And it's, yeah it's a beautiful thing.

 

JEREMY :

 

Yeah it really is, there is something to simplicity. To be honest with you. So I understand. So cool. All right well, Amy thank you again, and take care of that Toby / Ash

 

AMY :

 

Thank you. I’ll send you a picture.

 

JEREMY :

 

Please do. Yeah! That would be cool.

 

AMY :

 

Yeah, totally.

 

JEREMY :

 

Well, Amy, you take care.

 

AMY : You too. Talk to you soon.

 

JEREMY [narration]:

 

Hey, thank you so much for checking out this episode of In The Shoes Of. If you like or don't like the podcast, feel free to leave a review or reach out to me. My email is JNickel@InTheShoesOf.Org. I'm Jeremy Nickel, the host and producer of the show. Until the next time, see you later.

 

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